Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 33 results.
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Four longitudinal, empirical legal maps on LawAtlas.org that explore state-level HIA and HiAP bills and laws that were introduced, enacted and/or amended between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2016.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The authors describe Five Essential Public Health Law Services and suggest investment in the people, methods and tools needed to move major policy initiatives from conception to widespread implementation. The model reflects a transdisciplinary approach integrating public health legal practice with law-related surveillance, evaluation and enforcement functions usually performed by public health practitioners. As an elaboration of law-related activities within the Ten Essential Public Health Services, the framework can be used to define, evaluate and strengthen public health law functions.

 
Elizabeth Ann Glass Geltman, JD, LLM •
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy

This dataset explores which states have enacted death with dignity legislation, which outlaw physician-assisted suicide, which make the practice criminal and which are considering changes to current state policy legalizing the practice under certain circumstances.

 
Elizabeth Rigby, PhD •
George Washington University, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences

This study examined economic and health outcome data from all 50 states between 1999-2010. The researchers find better health outcomes in states that enacted higher tax credits for the poor or higher minimum wage laws and in states without a right-to-work law that limits union power. These policies focus on increasing the incomes of low-income and working-class families, instead of on shaping the resources available to wealthier individuals.

 
Richard Zimmerman, MD, MPH, MA •
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Center for Public Health Practice
Chyongchiou Jeng Lin, PhD •
University of Pittsburgh

The study, published in the Journal of the National Medical Association, examines the relationship between state laws regulating flu vaccines for health care workers and the state-level immunization rates among health care workers between 2001-2011. Laws mandating flu vaccines for health care workers increase their vaccination rates, according to a new study.

 
Ameet Sarpatwari, JD, PhD •
Brigham and Women’s Hospital Inc.
Aaron Kesselheim, MD, JD, MPH •
Brigham & Women’s Hospital

In a Perspective for the New England Journal of Medicine, Sarpatwari and Kesselheim discuss the future of follow-on biologics in the United States. Among other issues, the article discusses the impact that so-called carve-outs from state drug product selection laws will have on reducing the market penetration of interchangeable biologics.

 

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