Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 125 results.
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Evan Anderson, JD •
Center for Public Health Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania
Corey Davis, JD, MSPH •
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Leo Beletsky, JD, MPH •
Health in Justice Action Lab

A new Perspective article in the New England Journal of Medicine examines a recent decision by a Philadelphia judge to reject the argument that an overdose prevention site, called Safehouse, would violate the Controlled Substances Act.

The decision signals a move toward an approach to regulating drugs that minimizes both the harms of drugs and the harms caused by regulation itself – worthy goals all around, the authors write.

 
Angus Corbett •
University of Pennsylvania Law School

This draft memo, prepared by Angus Corbett, addresses the question of how local governments can enforce housing codes to enable low-income tenants to live in safe and healthy housing. It reviews the market for low-cost rental housing and provides an outline of the “dynamics” of this market. The memo identifies three models in use for enforcing housing codes: the “deterrence” model, the strategic code enforcement model and a meta-regulation model.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Gene W. Matthews, J.D. •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health
Gary Gunderson, DMin, DDiv •
Wake Forest University
Edward Baker, MD, MPH •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health

Public health leaders are called to develop more effective messages that appeal to a broader range of “moral foundations” and also to the new millennial generation who represent the future of the public health workforce. In this column, the authors turn the focus from the tools we can use to craft persuasive messages to the virtues that can make us worthy of being heeded.

Watch a short video describing the Becoming Better Messangers initiative.

 
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Adrienne Ghorashi, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Andrew Campbell, JD, MBA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Lindsay Cloud, Esq •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This article introduces readers to policy surveillance as a method to create empirical legal datasets, using two examples from the field of housing law.

 
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This article outlines 23 legal mechanisms, or levers, that may impact health equity in housing in the United States, and reviews the evidence base evaluating each lever.

The article introduces a model that divides the levers among five core domains intended to promote greater health equity in housing:

 
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

For public health, concerns about nuisance property ordinances are important, both because of the general importance of stable housing to personal and family health and because of the particularly severe consequences of eviction. Although other laws may protect the housing rights of domestic violence survivors, the fact that the main housing laws so rarely protect victims of domestic violence is concerning, purely on the level of legal doctrine and public policy.

 
Lindsay Cloud, Esq •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This study uses policy surveillance to compare the prevalence and characteristics of facility laws governing abortions specifically targeted regulation of abortion providers (TRAP) laws; office-based surgeries, procedures, sedation or anesthesia (office interventions) generally (OBS laws); and other procedures.

 

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