Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 30 results.
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

State laws setting the scope and limits of emergency authority are crucial to an effective public health response. This suite of legal data captures details of legislation that addresses emergency health authority introduced between January 1, 2021, and May 20, 2022, in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

President Biden made big headlines by pardoning federal violations of simple cannabis possession, citing that “too many lives have been upended because of our failed approach to marijuana." But will the decision really move the needle? Scott Burris, Professor of Law at Temple University’s Beasley School of Law, examines the ripple effects of Biden’s announcement, and dives into the implications of how controlled substances, specifically marijuana, are scheduled by the federal government and states.

 
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset is cross-sectional and displays key features of state Medicaid Waivers addressing COVID-19 across all 50 states and the District of Columbia approved as of July 1, 2021.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Lindsay Cloud, Esq •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Nadya Prood, MPH •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Bethany Saxon •
Center for Public Health Law Research

As the United States marks one year of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in more than 500,000 deaths so far and a historic economic recession, 50 top legal experts have convened to offer a new assessment of the U.S. policy response to the crisis in the COVID-19 Policy Playbook: Legal Recommendations for a Safer, More Equitable Future.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

In the United States, preemption is a legal doctrine that allows upper levels of government to restrict or even prevent a lower-level government from self-regulating. While it is often thought of in the context of the federal government preventing state regulation, preemption is increasingly used as a tool by states to limit cities, counties, and other lower-level municipalities from legislating across a broad array of issues. 

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This report offers policy recommendations on 35 wide-ranging topics from 50 national experts, from pandemic preparedness and health care to conducting sound elections and adapting immigration policy. Designed to advise leaders at the federal, state and local level, the report presents a timely examination of policy challenges and opportunities in light of the pandemic.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Gene W. Matthews, J.D. •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health
Gary Gunderson, DMin, DDiv •
Wake Forest University
Edward Baker, MD, MPH •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health

Public health leaders are called to develop more effective messages that appeal to a broader range of “moral foundations” and also to the new millennial generation who represent the future of the public health workforce. In this column, the authors turn the focus from the tools we can use to craft persuasive messages to the virtues that can make us worthy of being heeded.

Watch a short video describing the Becoming Better Messangers initiative.

 
Jennifer Ibrahim, PhD, MPH, MA •
Temple University
Aaron Sorenson, MS •
UberResearch
Heidi Grunwald, PhD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Using data from the UberResearch NIH grant repository, researchers from the Center for Public Health Law Research and UberResearch in Cambridge, Mass., collected and coded all National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants with a focus on health policy between FY’85 and FY’14 and then analyzed the grants by funding agency and topic areas. The study finds that NIH has supported public health law research, but not to the extent necessary to timely evaluate laws affecting the public’s health.

 

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