Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 84 results.
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
DeAnna Baumle, JD, MSW •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset on LawAtlas.org tracks sweeping legislation that broadly decriminalizes drug possession, providing a high-level overview of legislation that decriminalizes personal possession of most or all controlled substances. This dataset does not include laws or bills that decriminalize possession of only a few, specific substances (e.g., marijuana only or psychedelic substances only). It also captures state bills that were introduced on or after January 1, 2021, but have since failed, or are still pending as of March 15, 2022.

 
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset is cross-sectional and displays key features of state Medicaid Waivers addressing COVID-19 across all 50 states and the District of Columbia approved as of July 1, 2021.

 
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset, published on PDAPS.org, is cross-sectional and displays key features of state laws increasing access to buprenorphine and methadone during COVID-19 across all 50 states and the District of Columbia approved as of June 1, 2021.

 
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset, published on PDAPS.org, is cross-sectional and displays key features of mitigation laws at state correctional facilities relating to MOUD treatment across all 50 states and the District of Columbia in effect as of September 1, 2021. 

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset, which is published to the Prescription Drug Abuse Policy System (PDAPS.org) is longitudinal and displays key features of state commercial insurance and Medicaid coverage laws related to medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) across all 50 states and the District of Columbia, in effect between August 1, 2017 and August 1, 2020.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This dataset, which is published to the Prescription Drug Abuse Policy System (PDAPS.org), is cross-sectional and displays key features of licensing requirements related to medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) treatment for facilities and providers across all 50 states and the District of Columbia in effect as of August 1, 2020. 

 
Nicolas P Terry, LLM •
Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Medicaid is at the core of the opioid overdose epidemic. Both state and federal government reactions continue to shape the outcomes of this epidemic while death rates in some states continue to increase. There is a strong correlation between those suffering from opioid use disorder and those eligible for Medicaid. Most significantly, individuals with opioid use disorder enrolled in their state’s Medicaid program experience greater positive health outcomes compared to those without coverage.

 

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) uses medications, such as Methadone, in conjunction with behavioral therapy and counseling to treat opioid addiction. MAT with methadone is required to be distributed to individuals through an Opioid Treatment Program (OTP). MAT with methadone for opioid addiction is subject to federal law, with specific requirements such as physician evaluations, toxicology testing, counseling, and treatment planning. Some states go beyond what is required by the federal law and place stricter restrictions on OTPs, while other states simply defer to the federal law.

 

According to the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 10 million people aged 12 or older reported driving under the influence of illicit drugs. As more states have legalized medical and recreational marijuana and with the high prevalence of prescription drug use in the United States, drugged driving has become a public health issue. In response, states have passed laws intended to decrease traffic accidents and deaths related to drugged driving. 

 

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