Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 362 results.
Sophia Mitchell, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
DeAnna Baumle, JD, MSW •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Lindsay Cloud, Esq •
Center for Public Health Law Research

Unpredictable scheduling practices subject workers to irregular and inconsistent work hours and provide them with little to no control over their schedules. These practices have been shown to cause negative health outcomes including increased stress, food and housing insecurity, and negative effects on mental and emotional wellbeing.

 
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Adrienne Ghorashi, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This longitudinal sentinel surveillance dataset provides an overview of laws that limit the authority of a governor, state health agency, or state health official, regarding public health emergency orders. The dataset covers all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia and includes laws that were enacted since January 1, 2021, and were effective on or before November 5, 2021.  

 
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The COVID-19 pandemic both highlighted eviction as a public health crisis and exacerbated the problem. In a new article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, housing law experts at the Temple University Center for Public Health Law Research call for a realignment in how we think about and approach the housing crisis — and eviction in particular — in America.

 
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This research, produced by the International and Comparative Law Research Center with expertise from staff from the Center for Public Health Law Research, examines the legal framework applicable to emergencies in general and the current pandemic at the international, regional (EAEU, EU), and national levels (China, France, Germany, Italy, the Russian Federation and its subjects, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States). It includes both the preexisting regulation and its evolution caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
DeAnna Baumle, JD, MSW •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Jonathan Larsen, JD, MPP •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Elizabeth Platt, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This international legal research report, produced by the International and Comparative Law Research Center and including experts from the Center for Public Health Law Research, seeks to document effective mechanisms for legal regulation of the development and production of vaccines and the vaccination process at the universal, regional, and national levels.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The eviction crisis in the United States is a serious public health issue that affects millions of people each year. The eviction process is regulated by a patchwork of state and local laws and court rules that govern the judicial process, but little is known about the ways in which these laws affect the likelihood of evictions.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Adrienne Ghorashi, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Lindsay Cloud, Esq •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Rachel Rebouché, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Patty Skuster, JD, MPP •
CPHLR Fellow
Antonella Lavelanet •

The Identifying Data for the Empirical Assessment of Law (IDEAL) method, developed by a team of academics, lawyers, reproductive health experts and law students, follows three steps to support the development of evidence-based guidelines and practice related to abortion law. The process identifies social science and epidemiological evidence that does not explicitly address the law, but can nonetheless enhance the understanding of legal effects and identify research gaps and priority research topics.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This essay in The Regulatory Review examines the legacy of the US Supreme Court case Jacobson v. Massachusetts in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Author Scott Burris contends that the vision set by Jacobson — one of coexistence and cooperation in a democratic commonwealth — is in jeopardy as courts in recent COVID-19 constitutional cases have unveiled a new view based less on the social contract than on a strong form of libertarianism.

 

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