Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 266 results.
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This study, by researchers from CDC and the Center for Public Health Law Research, used policy surveillance to inventory state Medicaid prior authorization policies for ADHD medication.

 
Jingzhen, Yang, PhD, MPH •
Kent State University
Hosea H. Harvey, PhD •
Temple Law School

Using data from LawAtlas and the High School Report Injury Online between the 2005-2006 and 2015-2016 academic years, the researchers examined the statistical association between the implementation of state laws addressing concussions and actual concussion rates in high school athletes reported by athletic trainers. The study focused on nine common high-school sports: boys’ football, basketball, soccer, baseball, and wrestling; and girls’ basketball, soccer, softball, and volleyball.

 
Jingzhen, Yang, PhD, MPH •
Kent State University
Hosea H. Harvey, PhD •
Temple Law School
Marizen Ramirez, PhD, MPH •
University of Minnesota

This study examined the consistency and variation in written high school policies addressing youth traumatic brain injuries (more commonly known as concussions) in relation to the three most common components of youth sports traumatic brain injury laws.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Staff •
National Nurse-Led Care Consortium

This dataset identifies variation in scope of practice laws, including whether nurse practitioners are provided full or limited practice authority, whether there is a transition to practice requirement, and a list of activities they may conduct autonomously. 

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

A pandemic due to a rapidly transmissible infectious agent has always been a major threat to humanity, and recent outbreaks of Ebola and Zika have heightened interest in ensuring that governments are prepared to respond to this threat. Governance – the assignment of authority and the specification of procedures – is a central pillar of effective pandemic management. Without sound rules in place, ad hoc measures risk being ineffective or unjust, failing to respect human rights and worsening the impact of an outbreak.

 

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