Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 77 results.
Jennifer Wood, PhD •
Public Health Law Research
Jerry Ratcliffe, PhD •
Temple University

This research note explores complications with standard methods to evaluate place-based policing interventions. It identifies and explains issues of boundary misspecification during evaluation as a result of boundary adjustment by police during an intervention.

 
Frederick Rivara, MD, MPH •
University of Washington

The study finds that three years after the passage of a concussion law in Washington State, high school football and soccer coaches are receiving substantial concussion education and have good concussion knowledge. The study also shows that concussion education for athletes and parents is more limited, and that football players receive more extensive concussion education than soccer players.

 

This paper describes the current state of laws across the United States aimed at combatting concussions, commonly referred to as “traumatic brain injuries” or TBIs, among young athletes. Since 2009, 47 states and Washington, DC, have passed legislation designed to reduce the long-term consequences of TBIs in youth sports.

 
Allison Curry, PhD, MPH •
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Decal laws have been implemented internationally to facilitate police enforcement of graduated driver licensing (GDL) restrictions (e.g., passenger limit, nighttime curfew) but have not been evaluated.  New Jersey implemented the first decal law in the United States on May 1, 2010. This study investigates the impact of that decal law on citation rates, crash rates and prevented crashes.

 
Frank Sloan, PhD •
Duke University
Beth Gifford, PhD •
Duke University

This study finds that children in counties with unified family courts experienced shorter foster care spells and higher rates of reunification with parents or primary caregivers. Shorter foster care spells translated into improved school performance measured by end-of-grade reading and math test scores. Adult drug treatment courts were associated with lower probability of reunification with parents/primary caregivers.

 

This new report finds more than 70 Oregon school districts changed their anti-bullying policies last year to better protect students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, but nearly one in three school districts still does not comply with state law.

 
Jeffrey Swanson, PhD •
Duke University, PHLR Methods Core

This study takes as a starting place the inherent tension between public safety and civil rights in considering mental illness as a significant concern for firearms policy and law. This means grappling with the full range of social benefits and costs that may accrue in casting a wide net with a broad mesh to find a few dangerous people among the many with largely non-dangerous disorders of thought, mood, and behavior.

 
Jennifer Wood, PhD •
Public Health Law Research
Jeffrey Swanson, PhD •
Duke University, PHLR Methods Core
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Allison Gilbert Robertson, PhD, MPH •
Duke University

This monograph illuminates one key component of service systems, policing, highlighting the role of police officers as front-line workers in the community, and it examines trends in thinking and practice and common challenges surrounding policing and mental illnesses internationally.

 
James Anderson, JD •
RAND Corporation

This study improved on the existing work by examining these issues with a more rigorous scientific design. The researchers first examined the relationship between land-use law, the built environment, and crime using detailed block-level crime data and careful observations conducted on 205 blocks in eight different relatively high-crime areas of Los Angeles. They then analyzed the relationship between changes in land-use zones and crime in all neighborhoods in Los Angeles.

 

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