Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 77 results.
Jennifer Wood, PhD •
Public Health Law Research
Jerry Ratcliffe, PhD •
Temple University

This paper describes how the Philadelphia Police Department instituted a large-scale randomized controlled trial of foot patrol as a policing strategy and experienced 23 percent fewer violent crimes during the treatment period. The authors examine whether activities patrol officers were conducting might have produced the crime reduction. The activities of foot and car patrol officers research takes a closer look at what types are examined separately and differences between car patrol activities pre-intervention and during the intervention are explored.

 
Jerry Ratcliffe, PhD •
Temple University

This study revisited the Philadelphia Foot Patrol Experiment and explored the longitudinal deterrent effects of foot patrol in violent crime hot spots using Sherman’s concepts of initial and residual deterrence decay as a theoretical framework. It also explored whether the displacement uncovered during the initial evaluation decayed after the experiment ended. Multi-level growth curve models revealed that beats staffed for 22 weeks had a decaying deterrent effect during the course of the experiment whereas those staffed for 12 weeks did not.

 
Jennifer Wood, PhD •
Public Health Law Research
Jerry Ratcliffe, PhD •
Temple University

This paper reports on field observations of foot patrol officers involved in a recent experiment in Philadelphia, which were designed to capture officers' perceptions of, and experiences with the foot patrol function.

 
Jennifer Wood, PhD •
Public Health Law Research
Jerry Ratcliffe, PhD •
Temple University

In this article, the authors report on the efforts of more than 200 foot patrol officers during the summer of 2009 in Philadelphia. The results suggest that targeted foot patrols in violent crime hotspots can significantly reduce violent crime levels as long as a threshold level of violence exists initially. The authors suggest that intensive foot patrol efforts in violent hotspots may achieve deterrence at a microspatial level, primarily by increasing the certainty of disruption, apprehension, and arrest.

 
Caleb Banta-Green, PhD, MPH, MSW •
University of Washington, Office of Sponsored Programs
Patricia Kuszler, MD, JD •
University of Washington, Office of Sponsored Programs

Opioid overdoses are an important public health concern. Concerns about police involvement at overdose events may decrease calls to 911 for emergency medical care thereby increasing the chances than an overdose becomesfatal. To address this concern, Washington State passed a law that provides immunity from drug possession charges and facilitates the availability of take-home-naloxone (the opioid overdose antidote) to bystanders in 2010.

 
Carla Campbell, MD, MS •
Drexel University
Curtis Cummings, MD, MPH •
Drexel University
The Philadelphia Lead Court (PLC) was created as an innovative law enforcement strategy to compel property owners to comply with city health codes to remediate their properties of lead hazards, which had led to elevated blood lead levels and lead poisoning in resident children. This study presents a detailed account of and analyzes the opinions of fifteen key informants drawn from the Philadelphia health and law departments and judicial system that staff and run the PLC in response to a fifteen-question structured survey.
 
Jennifer Ibrahim, PhD, MPH, MA •
Temple University
Evan Anderson, JD •
Center for Public Health Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Alexander Wagenaar, PhD •
University of Florida

This study, published in American Journal of Preventive Medicine, details state distracted-driving policy across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The study finds, as of 2011, 39 states and the District of Columbia had at least one form of restriction on the use of mobile communication devices in effect..

 

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