Evidence Library

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Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The Problem: Firearms are the second leading cause of injury and deaths in the United States, accounting for 30,896 deaths and 71,417 injuries in 2006. More than 80 percent of teen homicides and almost half of teen suicides involved a gun in 2005.  CDC: WISQUARS.  More than half of all homicides involve a gun.U.S. Department of Justice: Crime Statistics.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The Problem: Domestic violence – the physical, sexual, or emotional abuse of intimate partners or cohabiters – is a significant public health problem. In the U.S., 25 percent of women and 10 percent of men have experienced some form of intimate partner violence in their lifetime. CDC Factsheet: Intimate Partner Violence. Sexual violence is a particularly common occurrence in intimate relationships.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The Problem: Motor vehicle accidents are one of the largest sources of public health harms.  Annually, in the U.S., more than 32,000 are killed in motor vehicle crashes and an additional 2 million are injured. CDC: Motor Vehicle Safety Factsheet. CDC Fact Sheet: Motor Vehicle Safety. Adverse weather conditions including snow and ice contribute to the incidence of motor vehicle crashes.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The Problem: The shortage of adequate, affordable housing can create pockets of concentrated poverty, exposing children and others to lead and other pathogens, which affects the health of children and families. The Urban Institute. Research on Record: Housing. Also, housing expenses draw resources away from health expenditures (e.g., nutritious food and healthcare). CDC and U.S.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The Problem: The shortage of adequate, affordable housing is a major public health problem, which draws family resources away from other health expenditures, such as nutritious food and healthcare, and exposes children and others to lead and other pathogens. CDC and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

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