Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 33 results.
Tony Kuo, MD, MSHS •
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

This study concludes that shared-use agreements that include legal clauses to address school concerns about factors such as vandalism, staffing and funding represent a promising strategy for increasing physical activity opportunities in under-resourced neighborhoods where the prevalence of obesity is high.

 
Hosea H. Harvey, PhD •
Temple Law School

This paper describes the current state of laws across the United States aimed at combatting concussions, commonly referred to as “traumatic brain injuries” or TBIs, among young athletes. Since 2009, 47 states and Washington, DC, have passed legislation designed to reduce the long-term consequences of TBIs in youth sports.

 
Y. Tony Yang, ScD, MPH •
George Mason University

The study examined how non-medical exemption laws for vaccines required for school or daycare entry impact the incidence rates for the five diseases targeted by the vaccines, and finds that increased levels of vaccinations could reduce whooping cough cases, but did not have a statistically significant impact on the average incidence for measles, mumps, Hib and Hepatitis B.

 
Frank Sloan, PhD •
Duke University
Beth Gifford, PhD •
Duke University

This study finds that children in counties with unified family courts experienced shorter foster care spells and higher rates of reunification with parents or primary caregivers. Shorter foster care spells translated into improved school performance measured by end-of-grade reading and math test scores. Adult drug treatment courts were associated with lower probability of reunification with parents/primary caregivers.

 

This new report finds more than 70 Oregon school districts changed their anti-bullying policies last year to better protect students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, but nearly one in three school districts still does not comply with state law.

 
Silvie Colman, PhD •
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.
Ted Joyce, PhD •
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Parental involvement (PI) laws require that physicians notify or obtain consent from a parent(s) of a minor seeking an abortion before performing the procedure. This study shows that prior evidence based on gonorrhea rates overlooked the frequent under-reporting of gonorrhea by race and ethnicity, and presents new evidence on the effects of PI laws using more current data on the prevalence of gonorrhea and data that are novel to this literature (i.e., chlamydia rates and data disaggregated by year of age).

 
Katrina Korfmacher, MS, PhD •
University of Rochester Medical Center

This article evaluated the effectiveness of a comprehensive rental housing–based lead law adopted in Rochester, New York, in 2005 by integrating analyses of city inspections data, a survey of landlords, landlord focus groups, and health department data on children’s blood lead levels from the first 4 years of implementation of the 2005 law. Although many uncertainties remain, this study's analysis suggests that the lead law has had a positive impact on children’s health.

 
Katrina Korfmacher, MS, PhD •
University of Rochester Medical Center
Michael Hanley, JD •
University of Rochester Medical Center

Although lead paint was banned by federal law in 1978, it continues to poison children living in homes built before that time. Federal and state laws have reduced rates of lead poisoning significantly in the past three decades. However, pockets of high rates of lead poisoning remain, primarily in low-income urban neighborhoods with older housing stock. Recently, several municipalities have passed local lead laws to reduce lead hazards in high-risk areas. This analysis suggests that local laws hold great promise for reducing lead hazards in children's homes.

 
Erica Reott, MPH •
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Kinzie Lee, MPH •
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Neural tube defects, such as spina bifida or anencephaly, affect 3,000 babies in the United States each year. The majority of these cases can be prevented by taking folic acid throughout pregnancy, through diet or other supplements, or through the fortification of food. In their Critical Opportunities presentation, Erica Reott, MPH and Lt. Cmdr. Kinzie Lee, MPH, make the case that fortifying corn flour could improve health outcomes and reduce disparities among Hispanic women and their babies.

 
Staff •
Center for Public Health Law Research

The Problem: Firearms are the second leading cause of injury deaths in the United States accounting for 30,896 deaths and 71,417 injuries in 2006. CDC: WISQUARS.  Firearms are used in84 percent of the homicides of persons between the ages 10 and 24. CDC: Youth Violence Fact Sheet.

 

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