Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 21 results.

This new report finds more than 70 Oregon school districts changed their anti-bullying policies last year to better protect students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, but nearly one in three school districts still does not comply with state law.

 
Richard Bonnie, LLB •
University of Virginia Law School

A recovery-based mental health system uses coercion only when necessary to prevent harm or arrest severe deterioration, only as a last resort, and always with respect for the person's dignity. Recovery envisions a process by which persons experiencing a mental disorder take control of their lives, including planning for care in a crisis, assisted by caring partners. For those who are strongly treatment-resistant or have not begun the recovery process, there may be no alternative to coercion.

 
Richard Bonnie, LLB •
University of Virginia Law School
Jeanita W. Richardson, PhD, MEd •
University of Virginia Law School

This article reports results of a survey of 460 individuals in five stakeholder groups during the initial implementation period of a Virginia health care law that enables competent adults with serious mental illness to plan for treatment during incapacitating crises using an integrated advance directive with no legal distinction between psychiatric or other causes of decisional incapacity. The study concludes that relevant stakeholders support implementation of advance directives for mental health, but level of baseline knowledge and perception of barriers vary.

 
Gene W. Matthews, J.D. •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health
Edward Baker, MD, MPH •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health

This article serves as a call to action to achieve universal health agency accreditation within this decade. The authors identify the challenge, and offer strategies and opportunities for implementation.

 
Gene W. Matthews, J.D. •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health

The accreditation of public health departments is expected to play a significant role in strengthening the performance, effectiveness, and accountability of the nation’s public health system. After extensive study, a national voluntary accreditation program has been endorsed by leading public health organizations, including the American Public Health Association (APHA), Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), and the National Association of Local Boards of Health (NALBOH). 
 

 
Gene W. Matthews, J.D. •
North Carolina Institute for Public Health

The existence of different types of accreditation legal frameworks, embedded in complex and varying state legal infrastructures and political environments, raises important legal implications for the national voluntary accreditation program. The findings from the mapping study delineate the accreditation, certification/assessment, performance management, or quality improvement program currently in place and the type of legal framework supporting it.

 
Orly Lobel, LLB, LLM, SJD •
University of San Diego School of Public Law
On Amir, PhD •
University of San Diego School of Public Law

This article demonstrates experimentally that individuals making decisions about their health management are affected by the decision making environment and that law and policy can serve important roles in improving the decision environment.

 
Stephen Teret, J.D., M.P.H. •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Lainie Rutkow, JD, PhD •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

The Attorneys General of the 50 states have considerable legal authority to protect the public’s health, yet their role in the development of health policy is often under-appreciated or misunderstood. This article analyses state Attorneys’ General current powers and provides a logic model that illustrates how the use of these powers can lead to the protection and promotion of the public’s health. The article then provides four brief case studies, to demonstrate how state Attorneys General have used their varied powers to influence policy-making and benefit the public’s health.

 
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Evan Anderson, JD •
Center for Public Health Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania

Legal intervention to influence individual health behavior has increased dramatically since the 1960s. This paper describes the rise of law as a tool of public health, and the scientific research that has assessed and often guided it, with a focus on five major domains: traffic safety, gun violence, tobacco use, reproductive health and obesity. These topical stories illustrate both law’s effectiveness and limitations as a public health tool. They also establish its popularity by the most apt of metrics – the willingness of legislators to enact it.

 

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